Wiley Koepp

Wiley Koepp


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Wiley Koepp

Title
Owner/Editor, Coyote Music
Bio
Coyote Music reviews recordings and live performances, publishes articles and interviews, and promotes musical artists through consulting, press releases, and concert promotion. Founded in 1995, Coyote Music thrives on its honest, positive approach, and experience working in most all facets of the industry.
Website
Expertise
unsigned, artist management, singing, social media, record labels, marketing, emerging artists, music publications, music writing / blogging, promoting artists, promoting music, music
Interests
rap, hip-hop, rock, folk, indie, singer/songwriter, music, folk rock, americana
Location
Austin, TX

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Jasper X submitted media.

Whirl Music by Jasper X

Wiley Koepp

Really enjoyable song with creative, though subtle, production elements (the slight variation in vocal prominence when the harmony & percussion enter in the refrain). I'd like to see something in the second verse, just so it wasn't identical to the first from an arrangement and production perspective. Short and sweet, but a tune that pulls longingly at the listener's ear.

With regard to promotion, in each aspect of a song's creation (and evaluation) I've come to ask myself, "What makes this song undeniable? What differentiates it from every song I've ever heard?" "Whirl Music" doesn't just sit there. It jumps, lives and has some spunk. But especially with a pretty straightforward singer/songwriter style, there is even more music out there with a similar presentation and dynamic. It's important with the creative process to identify what makes your art special and unique amongst the flow of music of similar style and message.

Jen Baron submitted media.

Wiley Koepp

No other word for this song but "cute," one you combine things like making "breakfast clubbin" a verb, the Casio-esque keyboard melody in the chorus, and the sweet-as-sugar vocal harmonies.  Could it be TOO sweet?  Thinking of where one might hear this song, it'd almost work best on the kids radio stations of Sirius XM (moreso than the Pop or Alt oriented stations).  

The production is clean and very pro. Diggin' on the simplicity of it, though I'd personally like to hear it kick into another gear after the first verse/chorus--something more full-bodied with drums, bass, and guitars, though not as superpowered as pop-punk.  Just a bit more gusto to take the listener on more of a journey.

Good song, though. Catchy and certainly with potential to attract the ears of dial-spinners or those whose stream this pops up on.

John Mondick submitted media.

So Much Sky by Birds Over Arkansas

Wiley Koepp

What a beautiful track. Melodies of folksy Americana but rhythms that move the song into another tier of songwriting and musicianship. Incorporating the sound of atomic movement further develops the theme of the song, as well.

While this song may be a little too intelligent for top 40 radio, stations like KEXP (Seattle) or KUTX & KGSR (Austin) might be receptive to Birds Over Arkansas' blend of beauty, creativity, and even catchiness?

Pete Lanctot submitted media.

Wiley Koepp

Great attitude. Eerie, bluesy, and badass.  Really enjoying this song. Looks and sounds like a song that'd be in a bar in a movie, in a joint we all wish we could be in, drinking whiskey, drowning our sorrows, looking longingly around the room for a candidate to create one helluva night with.

Music would do well on a tour through Texas. Maybe hookup for a show with Guy Forsyth.  Or in Brooklyn, find Bryan Dunn and his community of Rockwood Music Hall troubadours.  Great folks, great music, similarities in vibes abound.

Mike Simmons submitted media.

Youth Approximately by The Doom Tomb

Wiley Koepp

First impression is a mid-90s vibe a la a daytime set at Lollapalooza or the unreleased tracks from the 'Singles' soundtrack. Would fit really well on a radio playlist between The Cranberries and Blind Melon.  Interesting that the artist's take mentions "late 80s"--we're close, but I'd go with a 1/2-decade later.  That's minutia, though.

Really enjoy this song. Good summertime soundtrack, driving with that special someone music, or even that introspective headphones-on-at-home music when you just need some time for reflection. Pretty straightforward.  No otherworldly musicianship, but it's not going for that.  What I really connect with in this song are the Cure-like spacey guitars' soothing arpeggios and the 'singalongable' repetition of the chorus.

While I wouldn't classify this as a "holy shit, you've GOTTA here this song," it will easily go into the "I heard a song the other day that you might really like, by a new group in LA..."  

Nicely done.

Donny Radwell submitted media.

The Bitter End by Donny Radwell

Wiley Koepp

Donny,

I am all about homegrown recording technology, and 8-tracking one's rawest emotions into a sonic funnel.  And I appreciate what you have done with your '72 TEAC.  Even level spikes that create distortion are welcomed...until they become frequent.  Dialing down in input volume would make this listen more enjoyable.  It just peaks too much through the recording to be 'quaint.'

I don't hold that against you, though.  Life isn't about perfection. It's about emotion.  And you've presented a great deal of yours in "The Bitter End." I like "I'm too intoxicated to console." That's some pretty brutally honest shit.  

Life, like recording, is a process.  I feel like you're onto something.  You've presented yourself and your music honestly.  Even the 'false start' around the 2:06 point...it's endearing.  But there's something to be said for honesty + a clean execution of one's art.  I think you could lean a little closer to the latter while still retaining the merits of the former.

It's good, though.  Your melody sounds original.  I'd like a more solid drum beat...but it doesn't have to be Terry Bozzio. Again, just a little more former than latter.

Really enjoyed the sounds you've shared with me today.

Wiley Koepp, Coyote Music

Martin Tillman submitted media.

Zero Gravity by Martin Tillman

Wiley Koepp

Beautiful.  Composed from "the darkest trenches of despair" and "a reaffirmation of the power of the human spirit," Martin Tillman created "Superhuman" for his wife, in a loving dedication to her battle against MS.

The result is soundtrack-ready voyage through sound, a sonic progression that effuses positivity, hope, compassion...and love.  There is a reason that, when you watch a particularly powerful moment in film, that the accompanying music is so vital to conveying the visual and spoken emotions.  Music truly is the soundtrack of our lives.  And with "Superhuman" Tillman has chosen to share his personal soundtrack of some of his more personal emotions.

Charles n/a submitted media.

CHILL PILL by Charles

Wiley Koepp

Really interesting concept and music here.  Falls somewhere between jazz, ambient, hip hop, electronica...but it isn't any of those things.  I'm not completely in love with what you're doing, but it's certainly got my interest because it's different.  But also quite familiar.  I mean, you're not stepping into bizarro key signatures or atonal melodies.  The balance you have between odd/weird/new/different and comfortable/soothing/familiar is quite intriguing.  

I can totally vibe to this sound. I think it has pretty song commercial potential, as well.  This could be the song in the background of a new car commercial, or pitch for a new Apple iPod-type device.  It would be the new, fresh sound that would attract people to the new, fresh thing.

I like!

Billy Preston submitted media.

Wolves (by IRIS and featuring memoryfield) by IRIS (featuring memoryfield)

Wiley Koepp

Light, airy, and danceable, "Wolves" has a natural home on Top 40 radio, vying for a not-your-everyday-Top-40 spot much the same way Lorde or Gotye did.   Overall musical & production vibe is reminiscent of Shakira but Iris' vocal takes a decidedly non-Latin turn.

"Wolves" has most every necessary ingredient with regard to its radio-friendly nature: the chorus hits quick (~40 seconds), a sing-a-long melody, head-bobbing rhythm, and the pacing of the stops in the chorus followed by the hook "We Run Like Wolves" will stick in your head all day.

Lydia Luce submitted media.

Love You True by Lydia Luce

Wiley Koepp

"Love You True" is a gorgeous love song, a wedding gift from Lydia Luce to her brother. The lyrics convey the sentiment of love and dedication newlyweds (hopefully) feel toward each other but often have trouble expressing so eloquently. Musically, the melody and music are reminiscent of an Alison Krauss ballad--stark, harmony-laden, and poignantly tugging at the heartstrings.  The song could be a boon in the coming summer wedding season, a la Ben Rue's rendition of "I Can't Wait (Be My Wife)."

Ayo Adepoju submitted media.

Always by Bemyoda

Wiley Koepp

What a beautiful, touching song with a poignant and reflective video accompaniment. Certainly, the topics of loss, longing, and relationships are primary inspiration sources of the creation of powerful compositions.  "Always" seems such a fitting, worthy tribute to a friend who passed far too soon.

"Always" reminds me of Fisher's 1999 single "I Will Love You" because of both the simplicity of the arrangement/instrumentation and passionate subject matter. "Always" may have the potential to reach as wide of an audience, just by virtue of its honesty and emotional message.

Share this song and video. Spread the word. And perhaps it will resonate with listeners, exponentially.

Wiley Koepp, Owner/Editor
Coyote Music
www.coyotemusic.com

John Mondick submitted media.

Forgotten Lights by Birds Over Arkansas

Wiley Koepp

Very pretty Americana groove here, with "Forgotten Lights."  As I read the description, before hitting play, the words that jumped out at me were quirky, Americana Prog Rockers, Gabriel, and Zappa.  I was really excited to hear what the crossbreeding of Prog and Americana sounded like.  But then as the song progressed, I 'only' heard a wonderfully melodic, yet relatively standard Americana tune.  I like it, but the prog aspects really didn't show up until the 2:30 mark.

From that point on, I believe I was immersed in this Prog-Americana vibe...and I loved it!  Birds Over Arkansas has instrumental talent, vocal beauty, technical chops, and have really put together a nice blend of all these ingredients.  My only question would be, why split the song 50/50 into one style and the other?  I'd like to hear the wealth of the band's rich talents a bit more evenly dispersed...perhaps veering in and out of Prog influences toward the ends of phrases or sections, as opposed to that half & half song division.

I'm a fan, though, my criticisms are meant constructively, and not in a whiny, critical fashion.  The band has a very high ceiling to its writing.  Make the most of each verse, each line, each intro, and bridge.  Challenge yourselves and the listeners.  Compel new fans to delve deeper into their music-appreciative souls.

Well done.

Wesley Youssi submitted media.

The Darkside by Wes Youssi

Wiley Koepp

Writing in real time...  Aw, HELL YEAH.  Good ol' Texas Country Swing.  Except according to the album art, it's from Portland, OR.  Close enough.  Love the dark, lyrical twist. Tight arrangement, great lead vocal, compelling lyrics. I'm a fan.

Reminds me a lot of a cross between Dale Watson or The Derailers with a tinge of The Beaumonts to make everyone nervous.

Would love to be involved with helping promote Wes and his music!  Feel free to reach out: www.coyotemusic.com/contact

Ryan Summers submitted media.

Set A Course For Common Worlds by Midwest Soul Xchange

Wiley Koepp

I'm a sucker for vocal harmony so Midwest Soul Xchange caught my attention right away.  The sound, oddly enough, seems like a meld of Matthew Sweet's 90s alt-pop and...REO Speedwagon.  Somehow the vocal tones say "Kevin Cronin" to me--which is a good thing.  If you look past the late night classic rock infomercials, REO was a very vocally talented group.  So, yeah, pleasant sounds, catchy arrangement, and as the sun rises out my window in Austin, Texas, "Set A Course For Common Worlds" ain't a bad soundtrack for the moment.

And just as I was going to try and offer some constructive criticism of "spice up the typical pop song progression," you hit me with the measure of 3/4 time about 40 seconds in.  Nice job!  

David Cox submitted media.

Wiley Koepp

GREAT drum fill to kick off an intense Janis Joplin "Move Over" vibe. Love the high level of energy throughout the verses and chorus. The song breaks off into a more melodic lean during the 'bridge' section leading into the vocal-drum breakdown--harmony vocals are as tight as it gets!  I'd add Sate's "Warrior" to my 'Kickass' playlist any day!

submitted media.

Wiley Koepp

When I watch and listen to performances like Simon Wood Harris' Unidentified Flying Project, Steely Dan comes to mind immediately.  Immaculate performances.  Note-by-note perfection. A crystalline soundscape of effects pedals and gear fine-tuned to their optimum capabilities.  And the result, after "four years work, 7 different drummers, 8 different bass players, 5 guitarists, keyboard players by the truck load - and ONE completed track only!" is "There Is A Dream."

I cannot fully appreciate how completely engulfed in the songwriting and recording process a songwriter might become...but I've seen it.  After nearly 30 years as a drummer, I've seen entire albums scrapped, entire bands disbanded, and one man fret tirelessly over making 'the perfect album.'  And while I cannot personally understand what motivates such a quest, I do respect it.  Simon Wood Harris has a vision--one of such clarity that it takes a grand effort to see it come to fruition.

There is, however, a flipside to this.  At this rate, it would take the Unidentified Flying Project 40 years to complete a 10-track album.  I think there must, at some point, be a "compromise" of vision and musical reality, depending upon the purpose of a recording.  Is the end result intended to be sold to financially support one or more people?  Or, is the end result simply an artistic representation of one's vision?  Every artist has within them a unique vision and purpose...

What is clear is that Simon Wood Harris' vision *is* "There is a Dream."  The gentle repetition of the rhythm guitar, the quick saxophone burst, the pillow-soft hi-hat sizzle.  These sounds are a dream, and a well orchestrated one at that. Certainly, "There is a Dream," is a dream brought to life in the richest of technicolor soundscapes.

Ulrich Ellison submitted media.

Feeling So Lonely by Ulrich Ellison and Tribe

Wiley Koepp

Ulrich, you've got a solid mid-tempo Blues groove here with just a tinge of Pop to it. I'm familiar with your career and know you're a 6-string madman, so it's cool to see something a little more...commercial?  Not sure it goes as far as "commercial" but "Feeling So Lonely" has a gentle hook to it that can soothe the ears of listeners from all walks of life.

On the video front, this is shot quite beautifully, capturing parts of Austin that resonate deeply with its musicians--who've all, at one time or another, been on 6th Street with their gear before and after their shows.

Promotionally, Coyote Music isn't a label and our promotional efforts doing get your songs onto hundreds of terrestrial and satellite stations. But, for dozens of dollars (as opposed to hundreds or thousands), our online promotion of your video, shows, and more can turn some heads.

Great job on the video--it's a piece you can be proud of and, more importantly, represents your sound, style, and appeal.

submitted media.

Beach House by Paper Hearts

Wiley Koepp

"Beach House" soothes with its mellow, low tones, soft guitar tones, and airy vocal qualities--which peak when they split into gorgeous 3-part harmonies.  Dulcet, one might even say.  This song is made for a rainy day or an evening next to a fireplace with the that someone special.  Angel Ocana and Tiffany Foster have found a groove in this Beach House where they vibe together naturally. 

Production-wise, I can't get over the soft, warm tones.  Whatever the exact opposite of a bright, crisp acoustic guitar tone is, Paper Hearts has found it...and broadcast it across each and every channel in the soundboard.

Nicely done.

Billy R. Preston submitted media.

Can't Get To You by memoryfield

Wiley Koepp

"Can't Get To You" -- a pretty straightforward mid-tempo rocker with hints of The Cure in the arrangement and almost Shins-like melodic elements.  Guitar-driven song with writer Billy Preston taking the lead vocal reins. I'm a big fan of the mid-tempo rocker.  Seriously.  Between headbanging and slow-grooving, getting pumped up or drowning in ones sorrows, the mid-tempo rocker provides a musical solace...a place where the listener can simple bob their head in tempo, enjoy a pleasant melody, and allow the lyrics to bring along some food for thought.

submitted media.

"Criminal" by The Division Men

Wiley Koepp

"Criminal" by The Division Men is a hauntingly Tom Waits-sounding tale, with a rather impressive accompanying music video.  The concept of a narrative music video seems to have gone by the wayside, but this mysterious travelogue leads the viewer from Texas into the heart of old New Orleans.  Well-shot and using vivid colorscapes, The Division Men have something to be proud of.  It's not a gimmick, it's not going to go Miley-level viral, but is rather a respectable visual counterpart to their music.

Shean Roche submitted media.

WANNA GET STONED by flrpar

Wiley Koepp

Not exactly sure what I'm listening to...is FLRPAR a creator of backing tracks for rappers?  If not, I highly recommend it!  I could hear any number of local and big-time Hip-Hop artists flowing over "Wanna Get Stoned."

As it exists by itself, I think it's a good groove but it lacking some depth and variation.  What I mean is that it's a great 'verse'-like track.  Some songwriters call it the 'A' part.  Then a bridge would be a 'B' part, and the chorus a 'C' part.  As much as I can get into this track, I want to hear the B & C parts.

Great blend of samples and beats, though.  Really nice job.  You describe yourself as 'Cosmic Soul' and that's exactly what I'd call it.  Keep making music!

Gregory Robinson submitted media.

The Passage About Prato by Allora Mis

Wiley Koepp

Powerful tune with driving rhythm and laid back, spacey vocals.  Can't think of a particularly similar artist, which is probably a good thing.  Almost a Paul Simon-esque percussion/bass breakdown around the 2-minute mark. Very compelling!  Production is thick and beautiful--many layers dripping down my headphones--then the song culminates with a pleasant vocal harmony.  I don't know that this song will stick with me in the way that a more catchy, hook-heavy song might, but I'm impressed by the performance, production, and originality of the vibe you've created.

Billy R. Preston submitted media.

Wiley Koepp

A rich, lushly produced take on Bowie's classic.  The production is beautiful and broad-sounding with a stark, effect-less lead vocal highlighted by a precise accompanying harmony. Orchestral cymbal crashes blend with space-module-microphone voices and re-create a song we all know and love.  As the song builds, the "power solo" goes to the piano, retaining the laid-back spacey feel from start to finish. There isn't a great deal of interpretive creativity to Memoryfield's "Space Oddity," which isn't a bad thing.  No one's looking for a reggae-meets-dubstep remix.  A safe and beautiful-sounding redux.

Tony Banks submitted media.

Old School Love by Tony Banks

Wiley Koepp

Like the loop's groove.  Vocally, there's something about the manner of the vocal recording that sounds a bit 'homemade' - I'm not sure if it's the compression, presence, annunciation - but it comes across as more of a home recording, instead of a more full-bodied "wide" produced sound.  Lyrics are solid, kicking the nostalgia.  Gonna jam some LL next.  I could see this track being played on college radio and some local Hip-Hop/R&B stations.

Fluence Team submitted media.

For the Creative Community by The Fluence Team

Wiley Koepp

Powerful video, particularly mentioning the site's mobility, free/pay architecture, and interconnectivity among its user base.  Will certainly share on Twitter and Facebook.  As for improvements, I feel like a great advantage that Fluence offers is to get "micro-consulting" from a specialized population of artistic experts/consultants/professionals.  These services in the past would require a great deal of work to audition, interview, pay large up-front fees, etc. to be evaluated and receive professional advice.  Fluence takes care of all the overhead, and offers artists access to this service for a small number of dollars per session.

John Mondick submitted media.

Elsa by Birds Over Arkansas

Wiley Koepp

Really nice sounds, y'all.  Love the harmony vocals! Your voices are perfect fits for one another.  This song, as your other here, challenge the listener's rhythmic sensibilities (and abilities)...which is a welcomed change from the same ol' same ol'.  The musicianship all around seems solid.  Love the string riff around 1:30!  You've earned a new fan here.

John Mondick submitted media.

Catapult by Birds Over Arkansas

Wiley Koepp

At first the groove brings to mind a melding of The Police and Barenaked Ladies. The chorus/change-up brings a little more edge to the table, with the distorted guitar, but then backs down to the really pleasant indie vibe.  I wonder with the odd time signature if terrestrial radio would get behind this song, but it's different enough that I can totally see festival-goers rocking out to this at ACL or the like.  Good song!

Alexander Mitchell submitted media.

Audiokite Research by Audiokite.com

Wiley Koepp

Watched the video on YouTube. Cute. Straight-forward. Informative. Audiokite offers a really valuable service to songwriters. The strengths being objectivity and experience outside the songwriters' circle.  Seems well worth a try

Luca Hamdoun submitted media.

Serendipity by Luke Helmond feat.Corinna Covini

Wiley Koepp

My second exposure to Luke Helmond's music. Ethereal. Exploratory. Emotive. This would have been great background music in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. 

Ooh, a vocal! Breaks in around the 1:30 mark. Great female vocal for this vibe, leading the song from its ether into a solid, deliberate backbeat...but just for a moment, to get your blood pumping.

Still, Helmond's songs challenge me.  I like them, but I'm not sure what setting would be ideal for listening.  Maybe over the sound system at a coffee house, or shuffle during a flight, or perhaps on a long afternoon drive through the country.

Luca Hamdoun submitted media.

Wiley Koepp

My raw, gut-feeling feedback. The intro reminds me of a Nat'l Geographic Channel special on the planet and cosmos--and that's not a criticism. It's a beautiful montage. As the beat kicks in, so does the trance-meets-New Age vibe. The sounds and visuals are pleasing and compelling.  The music itself doesn't develop a whole lot by the 2-minute mark, which really only matters in pop/rock. This is a more slowly developing piece.  Then the piece takes on a more destructive tone...the closing image of the Statue of Liberty breaking apart is *powerful*. Nicely done!

I like this piece, both musically and visually, though I'm left wondering it's intent.  As a work of art, it succeeds.  If the goal were to attain some number of YouTube views or iTunes sales, I'm less confident.  It's a compelling piece to witness, but I'm not sure it's engaging me to purchase or rave to others about.  More of a "conversation starter."

Wiley Koepp, Owner/Editor
Coyote Music
www.coyotemusic.com

Carl Thewlis submitted media.

Wiley Koepp

Very pretty song. Curtis' voice is smooth, warm, and strong--great for pop and/or musical theater. The piano is well-played and the performance is solid.  From a more musically critical point of view, and this is nit-picking, I'd like to see this song produced a bit more to take it beyond just the piano-vocal presentation. It's not that it's lacking anything, but I think that to make it on radio, or make it stand out above the fray.  I'm thinking specifically of Bruno Mars' "When I Was Your Man," a recent smash hit solo piano/vocal song. Bruno had both his popularity and his extremely dynamic vocal performance.  With "Where Love Lies," Curtis does a great job...I don't think anyone *wouldn't* like this song...but I don't know that this particular performance has that Bruno-stellar-performance pop to it.  But again, I'm nitpicking so that there's something constructive to take away from this. Nice job. Beautiful song.

If you're interested in further promoting this song, or Curtis as a performer, please visit my website: www.coyotemusic.com - we've promoted hundreds of artists and reviewed as many albums since 1995.

Wiley Koepp, Owner/Editor
Coyote Music
www.coyotemusic.com

Max Rosengren Falk submitted media.

Wiley Koepp

Cinematography is compelling. Band is eye-catching. Song is a new-wave influenced blend of U2 (specifically the guitar tones), Duran Duran (vocal harmonies), and maybe a little Smiths (overall mood and electronic synth sound). Constructively, the hook isn't really grabbing me--can't really tell you the title of the song. But the lead singer's got a great pleading squeal at the song's peak moments. 

Richard Webster submitted media.

It's Not Enough by Unkle Bob

Wiley Koepp

I own Coyote Music, and we review albums, as well as do other online & grassroots promotion. We're currently running a few specials via fiverr.com/coyotemusic that offer uber-cheap, well-written reviews and social media promotion. 

You might also look at indiebandguru.com, indiemunity.com, and midtnmusic.com.  These three are similar grassroots promotional companies that, though they charge, cost *tens* of dollars instead of hundreds.

This song is beautiful, by the way. I can see this band and its music on festival stages right alongside the top names in the business these days.  Very indie.  I'm based in Austin, Texas, and this is right up the alley of club scene here.

Wiley Koepp, Owner/Editor
Coyote Music
www.coyotemusic.com

State.com submitted media.

Wiley Koepp

Brilliant ad that keys in on obsessions and frustrations we all feel on a daily basis. Addressing the question, for a small business, it's all about relationships. Establishing honest, real relationships with your social media just as you would face-to-face is how to break through the noise of millions of fluff social media connections.

The best example I've seen recently is Pinata Protest, a punk band out of San Antonio, Texas.  All four members and their tour manager spend a great deal of time on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook while they're on tour. Each of the 5 guys has a slightly different audience and appeal, and their constant, dependable access via social media allows their fans to go on tour along with them. In the process, they are building a stronger brand for themselves.