Mike Mineo

Mike Mineo


Feedback Ratingstar star star star star (5.0 / 5)


Mike Mineo

Title
Founder/Editor of Obscure Sound; Music PR Professional
Bio
I am the founder and editor of Obscure Sound, a site that has been exposing quality independent music since 2006. It has been featured in the New York Times, Boston Globe, Toronto Star, The Guardian (UK), The Independent, The Observer (UK), Wired, BBC Radio 1, Stereogum, New York Magazine, and VH1’s Best Week Ever.

Feel free to contact me in regard to music submissions for Obscure Sound and/or independent PR servicing, a comprehensive service I provide artists with. I have seen very positive results to date, earning artists spots in NME, Rolling Stone, Pitchfork, Indie Shuffle, and many more, including a nationally televised commercial with ESPN and several record label opportunities (with names like Burger Records and Rough Trade). I can provide rates and more success stories upon request ---> mike@obscuresound.com
Website
Expertise
music industry, pr, music promotion, music marketing, music writing, music writing / blogging, music journalism, music blogging, music reviews
Interests
hip-hop, indie rock, indie pop, rock, indie, electronica, pop, dance, ambient, dubstep, synthpop, electro pop, chillwave, dark ambient
Location
NYC

Send your media to Mike Mineo


Recent Feedback

Jake Chamberlain submitted media.

You Got It Bad by Jake Chamberlain

Mike Mineo

"You Got It Bad" is a lushly infectious effort with some notably unique production elements, like the fingersnap-like percussive component. Chamberlain's voice is technically flawless and is fantastic at making the transition from suave verse to effervescent chorus -- illustrated wonderfully around the 01:35 mark. At two minutes, this is a concisely contagious success with no criticisms on my end. It has plenty of potential for radio airplay. Look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future. Thanks for the submission! -Mike

morland gryder submitted media.

know you know me by Clast

Mike Mineo

Love this immediately. The clashing of darkly industrial instrumentation and ghostly synths, along with the hauntingly reverbed vocals, is right up my alley. The repeating vocal melody being eventually accompanied by trickling synth arpeggios and subtle electronic additions make "Know You Know Me" a fantastically hypnotic melodic crawl. I'm loving a bunch of production choices, from the whooshing percussion that emerges around 02:10 to the barren post-punk reverberations around 03:30. I'm really enjoying this, and will post it on my site very shortly. Look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future, and reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details regarding my PR servicing (rates, success stories). Thanks for the submission! -Mike

Chevelle O. Ryan submitted media.

BELLA (Prod. NYGE1) by Chevelle O. Ryan

Mike Mineo

The deep and emotive beat of "Bella" helps craft a constantly entrancing crawl through moving hip-hop/R&B with a striking dubstep influence. I'm loving several aspects of production, from the melodic autochord vocals around 01:30 to the standout minimalist fire from 02:30 -> 02:50; Chevelle's delivery is thoroughly impressive on a consistent basis throughout. The little lush bridge around 03:15 sets up nicely for an awesome finale where Chevelle takes on an otherworldly sci-fi electro feel reminiscent of Shabazz Palaces, which is very complementary. Really digging this track a lot -- no criticisms on my end. Look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future, and reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details regarding my PR servicing (rates, success stories). Thanks for the submission! -Mike

Jonathan Hasson submitted media.

I Really Like You (Lumi Remix) by Carly Rae Jepsen

Mike Mineo

Lumi's remix of Carly Rae Jepsen's "I Really Like You" does what a remix should -- it makes the original track even better, while showing off the idiosyncratic production chops of the remixer. Adding a shimmering and effervescent coat to the already-upbeat track, Lumi's textural and melodic additions highlight the greatest hooks within "I Really Like You". I imagine this track would be very successful on Hype Machine's remixes charts, which can lead to tens of thousands of plays. Let me know if you need help with that; reach out to mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details regarding my PR servicing (rates, success stories). Also, look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future. Thanks for the submission! -Mike

Matthew Squires submitted media.

The Giving by Matthew Squires and the Learning Disorders

Mike Mineo

In the track's first few moments alone, Matthew Squire's natural abilities as a storyteller are apparent; his visions of the New Orleans streets are vibrant and crisp-clear. With his melodically creaky vocals resonating over a single reverberating acoustic melody to start out, the addition of a trumpet around 01:30 over the ambient sounds of a crowd continue to set the ambiance beautifully -- similarly to the emotion and scene-setting capabilities of Sufjan Stevens. An uptick in vocal emotion occurs during this point in apt form, the structural navigation remaining quaint yet emotionally developing. This is a success for sure that reminds me of both Deer Tick and Sufjan -- very nice work! Look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future, and reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details regarding my PR servicing (rates, success stories). Thanks for the submission! -Mike

Dario Margeli submitted media.

Five Little Things by Dario Margeli

Mike Mineo

"Five Little Things" is a solid electro-pop track that reminds me of the genre's glory days. A gently caressing synth pad gives way to a lively arpeggio, which is aptly accompanied by charismatic vocals. The stylistic hybrid immediately brings to mind acts like Erasure and Pet Shop Boys, though with an additional modernistic edge particularly present in the loopy synth sounds around 01:30 that remind of more contemporary dance acts like Hot Chip. The hypnotic vocal repetition around 02:25 is a nice production maneuver that is one of several pleasant surprises throughout; I like the synth interlude at 03:06 quite a lot as well. Great work. I'd recommend browsing blogs with the electro-pop label on Hype Machine and submit this personally to them; I'd expect it to be very nicely received. This a fun effort, for sure. Look for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future, and reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details regarding my PR servicing.

submitted media.

Harmonic by JSME

Mike Mineo

"Harmonic" immediately draws me in with ferocious guitar chunks that remind me fondly of '90s alt-rock heyday. The vocal's entry - coinciding with a melodic guitar trickle and bustling rhythm section - is neatly led into. The vocals, with their alt-rock/emotive approach, combined with the wonderfully infectious guitar-led alt-rock/power-pop sound remind me of Gerard Way's approach on his recent album, Hesitant Alien. Essentially, this is an impressive take on alt-rock infectiousness, with an enjoyable tinge of prog-rock in the fastidious guitar incorporation and its warm rhythmic role in the anthemic chorus. I'm really digging the sound! Look for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future, and reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details regarding my PR servicing.

Derrick Dickey submitted media.

Another Late Night (sneak preview) by Digital Slumber Party

Mike Mineo

"Another Late Night" projects a gripping and dark atmosphere in its first few moments alone; the dark gurgling bass-synth provides a striking counterpart to the more playful, lighthearted synth lead. Like my favorite NIN tracks, I'm drawn in very early and captivated throughout. The track's alternation between more percussive-heavy sections and bare elegance (like from 01:45-02:23) provides yet another striking structural dichotomy that does the track's atmosphere and infectious appeal great justice. I also love the gradual additions - like the whirring arpeggio around 03:30 over the hypnotic synth lead - that steadily reveal themselves. This is a really nice track -- great work! Look for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future, and reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details (rates, success stories) regarding my PR servicing.

Derrick Dickey submitted media.

The Gentle Collapse (demo) by Digital Slumber Party

Mike Mineo

Happy to give another listen to your fantastic material. I find this one even sleeker and more effervescent than the excellent "Another Late Night", which is a testament to your stylistic versatility -- not always a given in electronica. I have no doubt now that your project is something special, though. "The Gentle Collapse" has a wonderful driving beat with airy synths and playful arpeggios that would be nicely set alongside Tokyo neon lights, or a thriving dance club anywhere exotic. The track's structural repetition is part of its strength, the vibrant synth leads and more patient warbly bass combining for a truly memorable melody. As mentioned earlier, with "Another Late Night", look for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future, and reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details regarding my PR servicing. -Mike

submitted media.

Find Your Way by Sonali

Mike Mineo

Sonali's "Find Your Way" is a pleasant acoustic-driven pop song that combines lyrical yearning with delicate and technically perfect vocals. Whereas the track could have easily opted to deliver some pulsating chorus, I appreciate the decision to keep things lush and light -- with a subtle string accompaniment and percussive shuffle in the backing distance. The percussive and piano-driven additions in the second verses keep things interesting beyond the first verse and chorus, which is commendable for any pop song setting its sights for radio play. Speaking of radio airplay, I could certainly see this being quite successful on pop radio. Although not stylistically inventive enough for inclusion on Obscure Sound, I applaud the excellent vocals, melodic charm, and several commendable structural maneuvers throughout "Find Your Way" that make it a stellar pop song with tons of radio airplay potential. -Mike

Karin Bengtsson submitted media.

My Love by Melody Carlsson

Mike Mineo

"My Love" gets straight to the immediately infectious point; a warbly and charismatic assortment of synths combine with Melody Carlsson's angelic vocals to craft a sort of idiosyncratic beauty not often found in electro-pop. Perhaps taking a cue from the London-based label PC Music, "My Love" is a constantly busy yet melodically accessible mish-mashing of interesting synth sounds and various otherworldly vocal effects. Carlsson's vocals are great even without the bells and whistles, reminding me of Jessy Lanza on Caribou's "Second Chance", With these fascinating uses of songwriting and forward-thinking of production in addition to this, it makes for one fantastic track. I'm really loving it! Look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future, and reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details regarding my PR servicing (rates, success stories). Thanks for the submission! -Mike

Jonathan Hasson submitted media.

Blissful by Lumi

Mike Mineo

The sporadic and lush string lead-in reminds me of Air's "Playground Love", but "Blissful" quickly reveals itself as a wildly infectious and colorful electro pop shortly afterward. It's a stylistically inventive and enthralling beginning that will grip listeners of any preference -- from fans of psych-pop to those who enjoy pulsating dance. Several instrumental choices - like the delicate keys over the budding synth developments around 01:25 - are fondly reminiscent of Swedish italo-disco projects like Air France and Sally Shapiro. I'm loving the stretch-y aspects of the synths around the two-minute mark as well, that being reminiscent of Unicorn Kid's aquatically atmospheric material. Lumi's "Blissful" is a wonderfully charismatic dance/electro effort with loads of color and personality. Great work! Look for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future, and reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details (rates, success stories) regarding my PR servicing. Thanks for the submission! -Mike

Bill Greenwood submitted media.

Elizabeth Distressed by The Paper Jets

Mike Mineo

Always nice to hear great music from my home state. "Elizabeth Distressed" is a fun blast through and through, projecting a crunchy vein of alt-rock and power-pop that reminds me of GBV and some of the more energetic tracks from fellow NJ natives Yo La Tengo. The chorus - "I wanna love you but you just don't care" - is wonderfully infectious. At just 02:30, this a concise blast of fun energy that is without any noticeable flaws. No criticisms on my end at all -- just a stellar track and fantastic sound. I imagine the sound is great live, too. Look for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future, and reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details regarding my PR servicing. Have a good one! -Mike

Andrea Gelido submitted media.

Gelido by Repeat

Mike Mineo

Gelido's "Repeat" is a thought-provoking piece of experimental electronica that begins with a scrambled sort of electronic transmission, like a glitchy video stream during a disjointed dial-up connection. This aspect of experimentation reminds me favorably of the group Matmos, who also begin tracks rather unconventionally before shifting into more melodic and approachable material. Fans of breakcore and glitch-pop in the vein of Tujiko Noriko will undoubtedly find solace in this sound. Although I imagine something this experimental will be tricky to promote, I recommend prioritizing niche electronic blogs that prioritize structural innovation and unnerving sounds. Certainly a fascinating listen and job well done for what's intended. -Mike

Alastair Sweetman submitted media.

U Ain't Gonna Win This by Japanese fighting fish

Mike Mineo

I figured this would be a fun track from the band name alone, and I was right. I find the sound VERY reminiscent of the group !!! (Chk Chk Chk), and that's not easy to pull off at all. The very active rhythm section, charismatic guitar lines, and charismatic vocals (reminiscent of Electric Six) make for one hell of a track that shouldn't have any problems getting attention in the blogosphere. Try leading submission emails with comparisons to !!! and Electric Six, in addition to prioritizing blogs who have featured either act in the past. I love the energy throughout "U Ain't Gonna Win This", for sure -- tons of adrenaline. Look for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future, and reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details regarding my PR servicing; I can help with that aforementioned submission email aspects. Thanks for submitting! -Mike

submitted media.

Gentlemen's Wine by Sean Terrell

Mike Mineo

The lush intro, with its caressing piano and strings, reminds me fondly of Ryuichi Sakamoto's cinematic work. The stylistic territory seems enjoyably uncertain at that point, becoming apparent quickly thereafter with its R&B/jazz-pop approach; with that in mind, I really enjoy the R&B/jazz hybrid the track successfully accomplishes, neatly adored by silky-smooth vocals that remind me of John Legend. The production is spot on, as well, with great vocal layering. This track is certainly ready to serve as a single. Love the nostalgic "just the two of us" nod toward the end as well. "Gentlemen's Wine" is nicely fit for contemporary R&B and easy-listening radio. Nice work! -Mike

The Dø submitted media.

Mike Mineo

Stylish video and track, for sure. “Despair, Hangover & Ecstasy” is an immediately engaging effort, with bouncy verses leading to an absolutely stunning chorus around the one-minute mark that blends together power-pop, rock, and dance for an energetic and hook-filled slab of brilliance. The incorporation of synths during the chorus' second half remind me very favorably of The Knife's more accessible efforts. The track's breathlessly energetic feel is conveyed wonderfully in the music video, as well. This is a GREAT track that should see a lot of radio airplay. I really think there is a ton of hit potential here. I imagine you already have representation, but if not I'd love to work with you. Look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future, and reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details regarding my PR servicing (rates, success stories). Thanks for the submission -- I absolutely love the track. -Mike

Michael Chung submitted media.

Beasts by Autumn's Mutt

Mike Mineo

"Beasts" is an extremely innovative track that combines idiosyncratic vocals/lyrics with a gorgeously effervescent synth accompaniment. The "animals, animals, animals" backing vocals add to the slight yet effective rhythmic accompaniment, yet still rightfully allowing the loopy synths and sporadic vocals to take the lead. The heightened pitch and handclap-like percussion during the chorus are a great production choice, with the melodic synths (reminding me of surf-pop with its harmonic reach -- like Brian Wilson's awesome material during the early '70s) making a great impression. I'm hearing hints of vibrant surf-pop and experimental electronica, not too dissimilar than the best work from Animal Collective. This track should absolutely find its niche -- it's fantastically creative and enthralling throughout. Really fantastic! Look for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future, and reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details (rates/success stories) regarding my PR servicing. Thanks for the great submission! -Mike

Jonathan Visger submitted media.

Dissolve by Absofacto

Mike Mineo

What a great track! Great to hear from you again -- one of my writers wrote about Sinking Islands a few years back and I really enjoyed it. As far as this excellent track goes, Absofacto's "Goodbye" immediately touts a well-executed burst of eclectic stylistic flair, enjoyably difficult to classify in its welcome mixture of nostalgic pop, warbly electronica, and hints of R&B. The impressive stylistic balance reminds of artists like Gorillaz and Beck at their best and most stylistically intuitive -- lofty comparisons but well-deserved comparisons in this case. I'm not exaggerating when I say this is one of my favorite Fluence submissions to date. I'm particularly fond of the glistening chorus, especially toward the end where the piano accompaniments heighten in pitch as they project fluttering arpeggios and then pause just past the three-minute mark, before it comes back around for one last delicious hook-filled finale. Wonderful work. Look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future. Also reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details (rates/success stories) regarding my PR servicing. -Mike

Brian Coleman submitted media.

Starting by Brian Coleman

Mike Mineo

"Starting" is a concise yet captivating track from Brian Coleman, who crafts a fully idiosyncratic sound that melds together vibrant synth-pop in the vein of ELO with jazz and rhythm elements. Armed with pulsating synths and a playful key lead that emerges around 0:51, "Starting" shows a funky infectiousness in the final minute with its brassy bursts and synth incorporation. This track is a great stylistic feat and really makes me want to hear more. Great work! Look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future. Also reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details (rates/success stories) regarding my PR servicing. -Mike

Harmony House submitted media.

Bergman Summer by Harmony House

Mike Mineo

NYC-based duo Harmony House show their haunting melodic abilities throughout "Bergman Summer", a track that initially begins like a flickering specter in its creaky guitar murmurs but expands into something very special. The percussion's introduction around 01:26 helps usher in the group's infectious pop sensibilities, which are impressively resonating loud and clear here. Comparisons to fellow NYC-ers Grizzly Bear are favorably evident at this point, though Harmony House also tout a unique ability to seamlessly swap between gorgeous naturalistic folk and pulsating rock, as evidenced by the great fuzzy guitar blast around 02:30, which turns the effort into a fantastic psych/glam-rock gem with shades of Tame Impala. Fantastic moment and awesome track! Also loving the NMH-esque wave of folk at the end. Look for a feature on Obscure Sound in the very near future. Also reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details (rate, success stories) regarding my digital PR servicing. -Mike

Taylor Adams submitted media.

John Beatle, Leader of the Lemons by Mount Vesuvius Death March

Mike Mineo

Alabama-based trio Mount Vesuvius Death March have a unique ability to craft constantly engaging experimental prog-rock, a genre where artists often fall plague to over-repetition or melodic strain. Not here. "John Beatle, Leader of the Lemons" is constantly riveting with its melodic guitar trickles and steadfast rhythm section. It's a very fun track. "John Beatle Leader of the Lemons" is a good choice to promote too; it will very likely get listeners to want to listen to the rest of Entrance to the Mountain, primarily due to this track's ability to concoct an fascinating soundscape despite a conventional guitar/bass/drum arsenal. The sound is warming and inviting despite its highly involved approach, with a slight whiff of nostalgia that enjoyably hearkens back to '90s alternative due to the aforementioned arsenal. Look for a feature on Obscure Sound and reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in hearing about my PR servicing. Thanks for the submission! -Mike

submitted media.

Mike Mineo

This is really great; the sound is already impressive and has heaps of potential. The nostalgic beat - with its heavy synth warbles and heavily slow bass drums - reminds me fondly of '90s hip-hop, with a darkly ominous feel eased by the charismatic vocal delivery and ingenious use of backing vocal samples. The call-and-response around 01:47 - with the lead accompanied by a deeper and more robotic reflection - is a great production idea that turns out great. It also provides a nice lead-in to the excellent and highly intense verses around 02:15. Both leads on this track do a great job of keeping it fresh, consuming, and innovative. I'm really digging this a lot -- it's dripping with atmosphere and genuine intensity. Great work. Look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future. Also reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details (rates/success stories) regarding my PR servicing. Thanks for the submission! -Mike

cody kohler submitted media.

Mike Mineo

A lively bass line and crisp guitars help lead into the raucously fun "Fragments & Blurs", a hook-filled take on alternative/post-rock with an angsty element that reminds me fondly of Gerard Way's new album Hesitant Alien. At first I didn't quite know what to expect with this track, but by 01:40 - when the track scales back to spacious deliciousness where beautiful reverb and guitar sounds reminiscent of Modest Mouse flow freely - An Old Friend's creativity shine brightly. What follows is just as enjoyably ambitious and energetically consuming. The group is significantly ahead of most contemporary peers in their stylistic niche; they show an ability to stray from the norm and focus on truly innovative fragments, as opposed to one linear hook yearning for radio airplay. Props on the ingenuity and creativity; your ability to balance both of these with audible passion is continuously impressive throughout "Fragments & Blurs". Look for a post on OS. Thanks for the submission -- keep up the great work. -Mike

submitted media.

Dusky by Nolita View

Mike Mineo

Nolita View's "Dusky" touts a fun take on power-pop/alternative that reminds me very favorably of The Go-Betweens, one of my favorite bands. So suffice to say, this really hit a sweet spot! "Dusky" tends to blend fantastic elements from late '80s jangle-rock and new-wave - like a comforting rhythm section and melodic nonchalant vocals - with some of the most creative elements of early '90s alt-rock, like the inventive guitar sounds of The Pixies and Modest Mouse. The whoo-ing backing vocals are particularly reminiscent of The Pixies. It also helps the already-satiating approach that the lead vocals remind me fondly of Ric Ocasek! With all these favorable comparisons popping up in addition to Nolita View's already-striking originality, "Dusky" is a pleasant and nostalgia track through-and-through; it's wonderfully accessible with just the right amount of structural unpredictability and momentum, which is particularly evident in the powerful closing minute-and-a-half finale. Wonderful work! Look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future. Also reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details (rates/success stories) regarding my PR servicing. -Mike

2k Boyz submitted media.

Mike Mineo

Twin brother duo 2k Boyz show ample airplay promise on "Feeling So High", a wonderfully atmospheric effort that is reminiscent of The Weeknd's ability to concoct dimly lit hungover-in-the-morning masterpieces. 2K Boys enjoyably have more of an emphasis on engaging lyrics and hip-hop techniques, a trait that contributes to the powerful central hook - the "feeling so high" chorus with the playful reflective vocal patterns - being a stunner with loads of replay value. Excellent work -- no criticisms at all on my end. Look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future. Also reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details (rates/success stories) regarding my PR servicing. Have a great night! -Mike

Robbie Jackson submitted media.

Translucent Girl by Keeps

Mike Mineo

My ears immediately perked up at the warmly caressing jangle-pop approach this track initially takes; it hits quite the stylistic sweet spot. "Translucent Girls" continues this jangly reception and, with subsequent hazy guitar lines, shows an even more intuitive psychedelic approach than first conveyed. It's fantastic. Then, the chorus shifts into a piece of gorgeous melodic ear candy that combines the aforementioned jangle-pop/psychedelic elements into one cohesive gem of a sound. Wow! This is a wonderfully colorful and charismatic track, full of immediate appeal and stylistic ingenuity -- particularly in the bubbly effervescence and trippy exterior of the instantly sing-able chorus. The final minute, a gorgeous instrumental finale, continues this wonderful stylistic concoction in pleasantly stellar form. Awesome track -- I have no criticisms whatsoever. Look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future. Also reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details (rates/success stories) regarding my PR servicing. Thanks for the submission! -Mike

Pedro Meirelles submitted media.

Mike Mineo

Based out of Rio de Janeiro, producer and multi-instrumentalist Pedro Meirelles' projects intense beauty throughout his track "Nostalgia". The vibrant composition, led by breathless keys and string swipes, is made even more affecting by a well-executed video that reflects the track's namesake beautifully; an old man's personal journey through his own memories proves to be occasionally overwhelming, but pure and beautiful nonetheless -- just like this exceptional track. Meirelles shows incredible instrumental and emotional grasp throughout this moving piece. Excellent work. I'm excited to potentially get started working with you on the PR campaign. Let me know if you have any questions at all. -Mike

Josh Cohen submitted media.

A Chapter Lost In Us by Stereoshock

Mike Mineo

"A Chapter Lost in Us" is engaging from the get-go, with lush swelling cinematic synths that cast a grandiose light over what's to come. The emergence of a piano trickle and the sounds of shuffling footsteps around 01:25, along with a creaking gate, begins the incredibly creative narrative aspect of this track -- making Stereoshock's enjoyable vision apparent even to those who have no background. Rather than merely sounding like it would be nice as a film backdrop, "A Chapter Lost in Us" seems to tell a story in itself -- with the long heavenly synth chords and occasional ambient effects combining for something very pleasant. Look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future, and reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details regarding my PR servicing. Thanks for the submission! -Mike

The Cloud submitted media.

Awake by The Cloud

Mike Mineo

The Cloud's "Awake" is a striking track that touts a futuristic feel projected by bustling cinematic percussion, melodic backing vocals (+ and a theremin-like reflection), and a slightly ominous grand piano backing. The track's use of percussion reminds me fondly of Jonny Greenwood's film scoring work, particularly how he utilizes percussion as a breathing structural force. The woodwind-like instrument that appears around the two-minute mark, and is quickly accompanied by an electric lead of sorts, injects an absolutely gorgeous Asian feel into the track that serves as my favorite moment. Excellent track. I have no criticisms at all, except I wish it was longer! Look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future. Also reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details (rates/success stories) regarding my PR servicing. -Mike

John Pollard submitted media.

Love & Alchemy by Descried

Mike Mineo

The dual guitar punch of a highly distorted rhythm section and nonchalant lead help construct the fierce sound of The Described's "Love & Alchemy", a riveting and fierce alt-rocker that reminds of Queens of the Stone Age with its crunchy hooks and life-in-retrospective lyrical content. I particularly like how words like "anger" and "pain" around the 01:50 mark are aptly accompanied by rising intensity in the instrumentation and vocals; this is a well thought-out track that will certainly appeal to fans of QotSA, Eagles of Death Metal, Them Crooked Vultures, and other various Homme/Grohl projects. It doesn't defy any stylistic norms, but that results in a pleasant accessibility akin to audible comfort food, making it a track that will be received by its niche favorably. Keep up the nice work! -Mike

Sydney Friedman submitted media.

Burying Love Alive by Sydney Lauren

Mike Mineo

Sydney Lauren touts a sleek electro-pop approach on her infectious track "Burying Love Alive", which reminds me of Erasure's recent material in its polished array of glistening synths, strings, and vibrant percussion. This track's central point is the outstanding chorus, which has loads of airplay potential in its easy-to-remember appeal and tremendous replay value. Although "Burying Love Alive" isn't breaking down any stylistic barriers, those seeking out radio-friendly electro-pop with some inventive flair should find immediate solace in "Burying Love Alive", a great example of Sydney Lauren's strengths as a vocalist and burgeoning pop star. No criticisms on my end. Keep up the nice work! -Mike

submitted media.

Don't Tell Me by Lilt

Mike Mineo

Australian artist Lilt will immediately appeal to fans of darkly anthemic electro-pop. Whether in the vein of Grimes' mysterious effervescence, Little Dragon's punchy infectiousness, or Nine Inch Nails' industrial atmospheric prowess -- Lilt seems to capture most stylistic approaches within this expansive niche throughout her impressively eclectic track "Don't Tell Me". With a naturally talented voice that possesses the ability to swap between deeper verses and high-pitched squeals of excitement - like Grimes - Lilt's vocal approach enhances the already-stirring power of the accompanying sounds, which resemble Little Dragon in the rising synth-driven climatics that drop around 02:55 especially. At that point, a spine-tingling hook takes place that will convince any listener of Lilt's treading-upward stylistic direction and talent. Fantastic work! Look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future. Also reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details (rates/success stories) regarding my PR servicing. -Mike

Digital Slumber Party submitted media.

'Skip The Day' by Digital Slumber Party

Mike Mineo

Digital Slumber Party's "Skip the Day" brings together the rhythmically exciting nature of glitch-pop with the melodic ear candy tendencies of downtempo dance and electro-pop, resulting in an exhilarating and hook-filled listening experience that concocts futuristic neon-colored visions of some technological utopia (a feeling capped off by the wonderfully apt music video). In addition to being a great track on its own, "Skip the Day" would be fantastic as a backdrop to introducing an exciting new tech gadget, or even as the score to a sci-fi movie or game ('No Man's Sky', perhaps?). My point is, the many strengths of this track make it ripe for plenty of promotional opportunities. It's sleek, atmospherically intuitive, and constantly riveting. Excellent work! Look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future. Also reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details (rates/success stories) regarding my PR servicing. -Mike

Rob Fleming submitted media.

Clarity by Rob Fleming

Mike Mineo

"Clarity" is a soothing and atmospheric track from Rob Fleming, who shows his ability to create stirring cinematic-like soundscapes similarly to the scoring work of Clint Mansell. This work is effervescent and exuberant; the gleeful guitar line around 01:30 - and then complemented by a graceful synth pad around 01:50 - helps lead into the track's central hook: the very melodic guitar crawl that starts around 02:30. The more serene section afterward is lush and patient in its approach, putting an elegant cap to this successful track, which has the ability to transport listeners to a place with greener pastures. It's a great structural maneuver. I absolutely think your works would be great for film/TV -- keep up the great work.

Rob Wilson submitted media.

Mike Mineo

Kyowa's sound is immediately striking on "The Ends of the Earth", with her beautifully haunting vocals taking the clear lead over a quaint guitar arpeggio reminiscent of Radiohead's most haunting efforts ("Street Spirit" favorably comes to mind). The introduction of percussion around 01:40 signals the next section, where Kyowa's vocals pick up a bit in enjoyable form, similar to how Beach House's Victoria Legrand transitions from her keyboard-accompanied barrenness to Alex Scally's guitar trickles. I see a similar dynamic here, and I'm enjoying the hell out of it. Lyrics like "when you reach the end of the earth, will you still want me there?" are powerful and heavy-hitting, this bit in particular reminding me again of Radiohead and the repeating ghostly power of "How To Disappear Completely" specifically. These likenesses to names like Beach House and Radiohead, combined with clearly enjoyable idiosyncrasies, certainly make Kyowa a name to look out for. This is such a great sound and track -- keep up the great work! Look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future. Also reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details (rates/success stories) regarding my PR servicing. -Mike

Epoch Failure submitted media.

Mike Mineo

"Champion" is a tremendously infectious track that gets right to the point, with a powerful hip-hop delivery flawlessly rhyming over reflective key-laden beats. The chorus, complemented by string-like synth pads and "I got the heart of a champion" vocals, is invigorating and memorable -- easy to remember and sing along to, making it ripe for commercial placement. The predictable structure is welcome considering the enjoyable contrast between the fierce verse vocals and the anthemic melodic chorus vocals. The bridge around the two-minute mark is a nice intensifying build-up as well, which leads nicely into the intense and energetic final minute. Good video, too. You certainly have all the materials to have a great 2015 and gain plenty of press. I'll definitely consider this for posting. Keep up the great work. -MIke

Cameron Outlaw submitted media.

Contain Myself by The Outlaw Collective

Mike Mineo

"Contain Myself" is a short but sweet stunner from The Outlaw Collective. I'm loving the exotic introduction with the tinge of jazz and funk over the mysterious synth pads. The soulful vocals - reminiscent of Little Dragon's Yukimi Nagano - are perfectly implemented, with a sensuous hold over the track - yet without dominating the excellent vibes of the instrumentation, lush and actively moving in repetitively hypnotic form. It really is as if Flying Lotus and Little Dragon teamed up with some Afro-pop vets to make an atmospherically intoxicating masterpiece. Awesome track! I'll be posting this on Obscure Sound in the near future. Also feel free to reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in hearing about my digital PR servicing (rates, success stories, etc). Thanks for the submission! -Mike

Ian Kashani submitted media.

If You Touch by Ian Kashani

Mike Mineo

"If You Touch" is a crisply infectious ballad from singer/songwriter Ian Kashani, who seems to blend the contagious melodic elements of '60s pop with sincere folk sentiments reminiscent of artists like Neil Young and Paul Simon. "If You Touch" rides on acoustic flutters and a backing reflective synth pad, with the occasional electric twang; it's a coherent arsenal that allows Kashani's endearing voice and lyrics to take the front stage. The track is brooding and unrequited of sorts, touching on the frailty of early heartbreak in sincere and affecting form. Nice work! I'm looking forward to checking out more on your site. -Mike

submitted media.

Quantum by Heiress To Atlas

Mike Mineo

'Quantum" is a shimmering electro-pop ballad with a charismatic vocal lead and full-bodied synth backing, which reminds me of later-era Erasure in its polish and spacey exterior. The vocal delivery really hits a great point around the 01:10 verse, reminding me favorably of Charli XCX, who is currently chopping the charts. With that comparison in mind, "Quantum" has considerable radio friendly appeal, with an innovative stylistic edge showcased by moments like the stomping 01:45 bridge, which resembles Crystal Castles in its idiosyncratic melodic twist. Capped by another go-around of the infectious chorus, "Quantum" is a solid electro-pop anthem that serves as a great introduction to Heiress to Atlas. I'll be posting this on Obscure Sound in the near future. Also feel free to reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in hearing about my digital PR servicing (rates, success stories, etc). -Mike

KING KREDIBLE submitted media.

PAIN KILLERS by KING KREDIBLE

Mike Mineo

"Pain Killers" from King Kredible rides on a nocturnal synth pad that's quickly accompanied by an inviting and charismatic hip-hop delivery, with a lyrical approach that blends great nights in the club with dangers of the mind -- a striking dichotomy that results in a thrilling late-night ride throughout the entirety of "Pain Killers", an accomplishment that shows King Kredible's impressive delivery and narrative grasp in addition to his structural inventiveness; the intense verses and more contemplative chorus/bridge contribute nicely to a hypnotic nocturnal soundscape full of both dread and excitement. I love the "just me and my painkillers" vocal bit that occasionally pops up too -- it's a poignant addition that makes the power of the track's delivery even more apparent. Fantastic work -- no criticisms here. Look out for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future. Also reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in details (rates/success stories) regarding my PR servicing. -Mike

Rain Valley People submitted media.

Mojo Moon by Rain Valley People

Mike Mineo

"Mojo Moon" captures the otherworldly yet futuristic vibe of Radiohead's OK Computer in its intro, at least to my ears initially. It's immediately engaging as a result. Moving on, the great vibes and infectious bursts of original songwriting continue in more cinematic form with a darkening narrative -- similar to the works of Jacques Brel or Serge Gainsbourg. The brooding subtlety of the backing string accompaniment, the "ooh"ing backing vocals, and Western-like guitar twang crafts a stirring listening experience that compares to a well-crafted cinematic atmosphere in scope. "Mojo Moon" is dripping with mystery, suaveness, and cinematic mystique; it's a fantastic effort. I'll be posting both this and "SusieB" on Obscure Sound at one point. Again, feel free to reach out to mike@obscuresound.com if ever interested in my digital PR servicing. Have a great night! -Mike

Rain Valley People submitted media.

Suzie B by Rain Valley People

Mike Mineo

"Suzie B" begins with a wonderfully lush intro full of acoustic strums and slight twinkles. Caressing vocals ease in, invitingly reminiscent of rainy-day '90s alternative-pop in the vein of Blind Melon's "No Rain". This Norwich-based trio sounds supremely capable of incorporating rainy-day atmospherics with acoustically-minded hooks. The track's structure is hypnotically repetitive, but onsidering the atmosphere and complacent soundscape at hand it's an ideal fit. This track is pure ear candy -- nice work! Look for a post on Obscure Sound in the near future. Also, reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in hearing about my digital PR servicing. I can send my rate and success stories upon request. Keep up the great work! -Mike

TJ Sarda submitted media.

Ice Field (Thero Remix) by Slow Skies

Mike Mineo

Lush keys that increase in clarity help begin this highly atmospheric and infectious track/remix. The ocean blue is an apt cover choice; the jazzy samples (reminiscent of Jens Lekman) and angelic vocal incorporation (reminiscent of Prefab Sprout) help create a weightless and semi-tropical soundscape that is typically characteristic of Swedish Balearic beat groups like Air France. That is a very difficult style to replicate, and honestly your approach is one of the best takes on the genre since Air France disbanded in 2012. The synths are so wonderfully playful and squiggly throughout, constantly accompanied by exuberant choices that range from the caressing vocals to the brass-esque synth sounds. I have no criticisms at all -- this track hits a stylistic sweet point for me, and I will absolutely be posting this chill-tastic gem on Obscure Sound in the near future. Please feel free to contact me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in hearing about my digital PR servicing. I can send my rate and success stories upon request. Keep up the excellent work! -Mike

Paul Todd submitted media.

Awfully Pretty by Social Station

Mike Mineo

Social Station's "Awfully Pretty" rides on a stirring robotic synth-pop arrangement that blends the melodic ghost-pop of Depeche Mode and Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark with a Kraftwerk-ian structure that uses hypnotic repetition as a strength. Gradual additions - like the shimmering guitar line around 01:30 - help construct this track's build-up as one that is ceaselessly engrossing. The nonchalance of the vocals and the synth's driving repetition exude a hopeless sort of darkness, though the guitar-based implementations - especially the twangy addition around 02:10 - help carry the second half of the track into more impressively eclectic and tonally effervescent heights. It didn't take much for the track's driving beat to get stuck in my head, similar to the best works of Depeche Mode and OMD. Great work! I'll be posting this on Obscure Sound in the near future. Also feel free to reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in hearing about my digital PR servicing (rates, success stories, etc). -Mike

Sydney Friedman submitted media.

Delete You by Sydney Lauren

Mike Mineo

"Delete You" is a modern-minded pop song led by energetic synth arpeggios and a youthful vocal lead working around a conventionally friendly club/dance build-up. Although it doesn't defy any stylistic norms in its first 01:30, plenty of unique stylistic attempts - most successful - emerge afterward. In its conventional sections, "Delete You" gets everything right about the accessible radio-friendly electro-pop domain in its catchy simplicity. More impressively, the pitch fluctuations around 01:30 mark the beginning of an impressive burst of stylistic ingenuity, jump-starting a minute or so of commendable stylistic exploration that I would love to see more of in future tracks from Sydney Lauren. I'm more personally keen on obscure types of sounds, so the 01:30 to 02:30 section really seized me in a good way compared to the rest. There's lots of potential here; keep up the great work! -Mike

Nicolaas Kraster submitted media.

Drinkin Again New EP by Ari and the Alibis

Mike Mineo

Flavorful brass, soulful vocals, and suave guitar lines make this effort from Ari and the Alibis a constantly consuming one. With a jazz-y mystique that would sound at home in a Quentin Tarantino film, the instrumental backing is fierce and infectious as the impassioned vocals lament the trials and tribulations that serve as an enemy to sobriety. I'm particularly fond of the brassy solo around 02:00 that exudes an exotic flair that's almost Saharan in its approach. This is an enjoyably stylistically eclectic offering with plenty of emotional passion; I wouldn't be surprised if you guys are a fantastic live band, as well. Keep up the great work, and thanks for the submission. -Mike

submitted media.

New Years Eve by Joe Achi

Mike Mineo

"New Years Eve" is a very impressive effort from Norwegian artist Joe Achi, who manages to create a soulful R&B/electro-pop hybrid reminiscent of The Weeknd's morning-after vibes. Achi's stylistic innovation comes in his effective ability to throw in doses of hip-hop in the midst of the caressing piano-laden R&B, which he shows adeptly throughout "New Years Eve". Moments like the 02:12 mark, where the warbly guitar and sporadic percussion complement a concise yet punchy hip-hop delivery, help further reinforce the contrasting ethereal approach of the other sections. It's an ingenious structural maneuver that works perfectly with Achi's sound. The additional exotic synth pads and accompaniments around 03:30 are a great addition, as well, helping to close a very gripping effort. Fantastic work! I'll be posting this on Obscure Sound in the near future. Also feel free to reach out to me at mike@obscuresound.com if interested in hearing about my digital PR servicing (rates, success stories, etc). -Mike