G P

G P

G P


Bio
Emo based music from the garage.
Website
Location
Connecticut

Recent Submissions

G P submitted media.

Angela Mastrogiacomo

Although the first 20 seconds or so were a little slow for me, I thought the creativity of the rocks (once I saw where it was going) and the way it carries through the video is really clever, especially with even including the music notes.

That said, it's still a little bit slow for me and the shaky camera and poor lighting makes it a little bit hard for me to get into as much as I'd like. It's a creative idea though!

Music Supervisors

Very good. As far as feedback, The song itself works though I would consider a few different mixes, maybe some more reverb/delay in some areas (vocals, etc.) to add a little more depth and environment to the mix. But I realize those are small things, but I feel trying different colors can sometimes make a big difference. I will definitely pass this music along to my associates in film and tv, along with your info. Keep up the good work, sometimes you never know what song or style is going to be the right fit for a film, tv show or commercial. You're on the right rack.

SD Hox

Strong vocals and a lovely fiddle. I like this track, especially the solo around the two minute mark. Job well done! Thanks for sharing and keep up the great work!

Lauren Gribble

Hello! I really enjoyed the song and I loved how you spelled out everything with the rocks! I thought the strings really complimented the track and made everything come to together nicely. Hope to hear more music from you soon!

Chris Lovett

Hi thanks for reaching out to us. I was really confused at the start with all the stones, wondered what was going on but once it gets going, its quite an innovative idea actually, i liked how you put it together. As a complete piece, i think its a solid offering, it doesnt rock my world really but i am appreciative of the musicianship and introduction of the violin in the background. That adds another layer to it which is good. I'm not 100% of the vocals, those deep tones have potential to really give goosebumps through the emotion but i dont think there was enough on offer here. I'd want more.
From a promotional aspect, the first thing really is understanding what you deem as 'success', is it fame, fortune, recognition or a space to be creative with friends, collaborate and put your art out into the world? This is quite crucial as gives your realistic expectations and focuses your energies. There are a number of things you can do to push your sound, i'll go through some you can do yourself, without spending anything. Firstly don't buy plays or followers on any platform. Let things grow organically or from your own promotion activities. Get on all relevant platforms, i found you on bandcamp and youtube but thats it. Get yourself on soundcloud, spotify etc and add your profile to such things like vimeo and socials like twitter and instagram. People look for music in many places so the more platforms youre on the more people will see and hear it. 
Collaborating with others is both rewarding from a personal perspective (you'll get to meet more talented people) and growing your brand. If you start writing or collaborating with people, it will open up some many avenues for further opportunities. Their fans will see they have collaborated with you and check you out, theres possible support slots at their shows as well, i mean, theres so much growth in this one, its great. If you are proactive and reach out to people who are based near you, who knows what could happen. 
Radio is another good one but is quite easy to do, requires a bit of research to start with. Look for community or local radio stations online (tunein app is a good place to start), and submit your music to them. Again this is making connections proactively. Blogs are a bit harder but there is no harm researching music blogs that write about your style of music. You have a video here that is worth writing about so why not send it to 10 low key blogs and see what happens. 
Its great that you're on this journey and i wish you all the best with it. Chris

Naomi Manvell

Clever video with the rocks!
Lovely lyrics and the strings in the background really added to the simple sound.

Dave Clifford

The rock lettering video concept is excellent. Really keeps your attention. I kept expecting the song to pick up a bit or transition into a new melody, bridge or something to keep it rolling. There's plenty to be said for a simple acoustic guitar and violin song that just maintains an intimate mood, but the structure of this song really seems to be building toward something that doesn't peak emotionally or musically. It's a nice song, but I think it could use another part or some other plateau within. 

Indie Band Guru

Nice emotion-filled vocals.
Cool lyric video idea. Only critique would be the shakiness of the video. It is cool for effect but the full video like that became headache inspiring for my older eyes.

RADIO KSCR

I really liked the music video I think it is very creative.  I wish that the camera would have been a little steadier.  I feel like the song was missing something.  I think that I would like to have heard a little more production behind the song.  I think that both the song and music video were good.

Benjamin Groff

Hey there!  This was a really immediately compelling video.  Super low budget and super high concept.  Really a pleasant surprise.   As far as the song goes, i think it's good but I was really hoping to get a bigger chorus arrival moment, where at least to me it felt / sounded like it was a verse after another.  Great violin work.  I feel the recording of the violin was really captured great but the guitar / vocal could use a better mix / recording or maybe even trying to layer up the guitars will make it feel more solid and big?   I'm not sure it works for the We Are: The Guard blog or the signings i'm working on the moment but I'm hoping the feedback was helpful.  Again, really loved the video concept! 

Raymond Flotat

Thanks very much for the submission. So a good song overall. Little I would suggest in terms of feedback there as it's pretty straightforward and solid. Might be worth trying a few different vocal takes to experiment with different expressive range just to really get a sense of permutations and how that may or may not improve the song. The problem for me here is the video is a bit too shaky. I'm actually not one ever bothered by shaky cam footage, but this, even though I love the idea and how it looks was almost too shaky to watch. Kind of was giving me a headache. It might be worth trying the whole thing again with some kind of steadycam apparatus to film it? I know that some people I know wouldn't be able to watch the video at all they're so sensitive to shaky footage. Thanks!!

D Grant Smith

Overall I like the song. Interesting video and use of rocks to serve as captions. That's actually incredibly creative.

The mix you have is where I think you could improve. A mastering specialist can give you some insights into making the final mix really shine. Overall though, this is a nice song.

Scott Cohen

Good solid track.  You are in a crowded space with lots of similar artists.  You need to find a way to stand out from the crowd.  Being good is not good enough.  But you have it in you.

Liane Chan

This was a cleverly made video and the song was very melancholic and bittersweet. I think the violins definitely made it a lot more wistful sounding, effectively representing how long distance can make relationships harder. This was an interesting song and video that works well in showing love can be tough. The lyrics and vocals have clearly portray the loneliness and longing that goes with long distance love.

Brian Hazard

The video got off to a rocky start, but... 😂

The violin is wonderful and provides some much needed character to an otherwise bland arrangement. That said, it can't save the song from feeling repetitive. It's just three chords, the same melodic line over and over, and no real chorus or build to anything. It starts as it ends, and doesn't really go anywhere in between.

The vocal quality is mostly fine, but it feels a bit pushed, occasionally resulting in pitch problems - especially the trailing note of the phrase, which doesn't always work with the chord even when it's in tune.

The lyrics are vague and unspecific. You might argue that they're universal, but it doesn't feel like we're talking about real people here. Specific details and concrete imagery would go a long way towards an emotional connection with the listener. Even just some sensory details (cold sweat, sound of laughter, fading darkness, grinding of stone, etc).

I totally thought the rocks said "elfin" at the end, as in "of elves." And then I realized it was "el fin." Doh!

So I don't think it's quite at the level it would need to be for a share, but I do appreciate your sharing it with me! Hopefully you find the feedback helpful for your next song.

A couple suggestions for future Fluence submissions:

1. Include the lyrics so we can follow along (it would be nice to have them all in one place)

2. Include a short, catchy description of the song or act that's easy to copy/paste for social media sharing. That way we don't have to strain our brain coming up with something clever, and you get to choose how you're presented to the world.

Brian.

Alan Cross

Clever video! I like it a lot. A nice twist on the regular lyric video. It shows you don't need anything more than a phone and some basic editing software to make something with impact.

Nothing much for me about composition, performance, or production. I do, however, have some questions worth pondering.

1.  What are your career goals? Radio play? Recording? Licensing and syncs? Income from a publishing deal? Soundtracks? All these paths need to be investigated.

2. Your social media strategy will be key. Make sure that you reply to every comment that may come in. Turn early fans into evangelists, especially the ones who contributed to this video. Get them to spread the word.  

3. If you don't already, get someone to handle getting your material on streaming music services, especially someone who knows how to get your songs on the best and music influential new music/new discovery playlists. They're becoming increasingly important. Ask Drake what it's like to benefit from clever playlist placement. 

4. If radio airplay is important to you, get a radio plugger. They know how to get to the right music directors. Work with both campus stations and public radio which is probably where a song like this has its best chance.

5. Make friends with as many bloggers as possible. Even the smallest want to think that they can discover The Next Big Thing. Every little bit of coverage helps.

6. Wanna know if your material is great? (1) Are you friends and family raving about your stuff? (2) Are people actively seeking you out? If the answer to both those questions is "yes." You may have something on your hands. If not, then maybe what you're offering just isn't good enough to cut through all the noise. Remember that no one has a RIGHT to have their music heard. Your music has to demand people's attention on its own.

7. How often do you play live? Nothing is better than having a group of strangers giving you real feedback in real time. I suspect you already know that, though.

8. Record labels are weird these days. They're all about pop and hip-hop. You may be best going about things on your own until such time that a label can't ignore you any longer. Word of mouth is going to be your best friend at this point.

Hope that helps. Lemme share this on my social networks. That'll be good for about 100,000 people.




Bob Lugowe

Enjoyable tune with a creative lyric video to go with it. For starters, I would suggest including a short bio about the artists along with links to hear more music, same goes with the description on your youtube video, at least make it easy for people to click a link to hear more music. Consider making your album pay-what-you want on bandcamp instead of charging for it so you can get as many people as possible to listen to it and become a potential fan. I def think you have talent but if you're looking to take things to the next level, make sure you're playing out live as much as possible and honing in on your songcraft and aesthetic as having the total package is important in order to get noticed. Best of luck!

G P submitted media.

John Masters

Nice guitar sound, somewhat on the folky side -- not sure what that other instrument is, maybe a violin?  Not entirely my cup of tea but well executed for the genre.

Liane Chan

This song seems to have a lot of raw emotion in it, but is also kind of sad. The simplicity of the instrumentation is nice, and mixes well with the vocals.

Angela Mastrogiacomo

The music and vocals feel a little out of sync to me—it seems the vocals should be a little softer, but I have to say the instrumentals are beautiful. It creates a really strong, emotional response, which I just love.

Raymond Flotat

Good song. There's one thing bothering me about it. Hard to pinpoint, but it feels like the vocals are too loud in the mix? Almost like the bass is turned up too loud? Feels like it's overpowering the rest of the music. Might be good to try a few different mixes of the song and see how they feel. Would also suggest trying a few different slightly altered vocal takes. Might be good to try to some slight variations and see how different approaches feel. Thanks very much for the submission!

Indie Band Guru

The music has potential to be truly beautiful. I am not sure about the mix here though. The vocals do not seem to blend well with the mellow tone. The pieces are there though.

D Grant Smith

Nice tune. The string overlay sounds nice. Sad tune but moving. 

SD Hox

Heartfelt vocals let the emotions come through on this track. Nice work and looking forward to hearing more from The Unfinished Story. Thanks for sharing.

Alan Cross

Good performance, production, and performance. I do wonder, though, what this might sound like in the hands of a different producer. That's not a criticism. I'm just thinking out loud.

Now some questions:

1.  What are your career goals? Radio play? Recording? Licensing and syncs? Income from a publishing deal? Soundtracks? All these paths need to be investigated.

2. Your social media strategy will be key. Make sure that you reply to every comment that may come in. Turn early fans into evangelists, especially the ones who contributed to this video. Get them to spread the word.  

3. If you don't already, get someone to handle getting your material on streaming music services, especially someone who knows how to get your songs on the best and music influential new music/new discovery playlists. They're becoming increasingly important. Ask Drake what it's like to benefit from clever playlist placement. 

4. If radio airplay is important to you, get a radio plugger. They know how to get to the right music directors. Work with both campus stations and public radio. You might find some interesting at AC and AAA radio, too. 

5. Make friends with as many bloggers as possible. Even the smallest want to think that they can discover The Next Big Thing. Every little bit of coverage helps.

5. Wanna know if your material is great? (1) Are you friends and family raving about your stuff? (2) Are people actively seeking you out? If the answer to both those questions is "yes." You may have something on your hands. If not, then maybe what you're offering just isn't good enough to cut through all the noise. Remember that no one has a RIGHT to have their music heard. Your music has to demand people's attention on its own.

6. How often do you play live? Nothing is better than having a group of strangers giving you real feedback in real time. 

7. Record labels are weird these days. They're all about pop and hip-hop. You may be best going about things on your own until such time that a label can't ignore you any longer. 

Hope that helps.


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