Jake Hackett

Jake Hackett

Jake Hackett


Title
Composer, Arranger, Multi-instrumentalist and Record Producer
Bio
My name is Jake Hackett, I'm from Coventry, England and my brain is hardwired for music. Playing it, composing it, arranging it, producing it, recording it. Music is a way of life for me.

I've been playing the guitar since 1992, keyboard instruments since 2000 and the saxophone since 2007. I've been writing music since 1996 and played in various bands and ensembles from the mid 1990s through to the mid 2000s.

I taught myself how to compose and score orchestral music by reading books and listening to records between 2009 - 2012.

From 2013 - 2018 I produced, arranged, co-wrote, co-mixed and played all the instruments on the double album Ripped Gratification which was released commercially on 22nd June 2018.

Here are some reviews of the album:

Some reviews of the album:

"......absolute masterpiece....."

https://www.anrfactory.com/the-ripping-rivers-ripped-gratification-concordantly-visceral-indie-rock/

"Masterpiece"

https://twitter.com/PeteChambersCov/status/1029997755484332032

".....true example of a magnum opus...."  ".....the most epic work of art possible...."

https://www.midtnmusic.com/the-ripping-rivers-ripped-gratification-might-be-their-magnum-opus-listen-now/

"Complex. Intense. Colourful"

http://thearkofmusic.com/the-ripping-rivers/

"Everyone needs to take a listen"

https://twitter.com/IndieBandGuru/status/1033922313455116289

I'm currently in post production for my second album and I'm currently writing my 3rd album.
Interests
music
Location
Coventry, England

Recent Submissions

Jake Hackett submitted media.

Fireworks by The Ripping Rivers

Lauren Gribble

Hi guys! Thanks for submitting your music! I love what I heard and everything about it was positive for me, no complaints at all. I thought all the instruments and different sounds went really well together, and the vocals were spot on.  Please feel free to submit more new music when you have it. 

Alan Cross

Nice material. I had it on while I was doing some writing and I found it helped me focus on the task at hand. I also applaud your willingness to try something long-form. In the age of Spotify, that's something we're seeing less and less--and I think that's a bad thing.

This isn't radio-friendly in its current form, but I expect you know that. The trick will be finding a home for what you do. This is something faced by almost every band who might be considered post-rock. Still, it can be done. Just ask Explosions in the Sky.

Here are some questions.

1.  What are your career goals? Radio play? Recording? Licensing and syncs? Income from a publishing deal? Soundtracks? Just having fun? All these paths need to be investigated. 

2. You're probably going to need a manager at some point, someone to take care of all the business while you focus on the music.

3. Your social media strategy will be key. Make sure that you reply to every comment that may come in. Turn early fans into evangelists. Get them to spread the word.  

4. If you don't already, get someone to handle getting your material on streaming music services, especially someone who knows how to get your songs on the best and music influential new music/new discovery playlists. They're becoming increasingly important. Ask Drake what it's like to benefit from clever playlist placement. 

5. If radio airplay is important to you, choose a different song. I don't see how this track could be edited down to something a music director would consider.

6. Make friends with as many bloggers as possible. Even the smallest want to think that they can discover The Next Big Thing. Every little bit of coverage helps.

7. If the budget allows, consider creating a video, even if it's just a lyric video. YouTube is still the #1 source of music discovery.

8. Do you play live? That's the fastest way to determine if you're on the right path. There's nothing like an audience telling you the truth in real time. 

Let me spread this to my social networks. That'll be good for at least 100,000 people. 

Bob Lugowe

This is definitely cool and very ambitious in its scope. You managed to capture a huge sound with the self-production so kudos there. I would start by suggesting including a bio about the group along with links to hear more music in the Fluence description. Also consider putting your music on Bandcamp as that's the #1 platform for independent artists. It reminds me a bit of Queen / Meat Loaf in the composition and structures. To be honest, I'm not a big fan of the name and don't think it represents what the music sounds like. I would also suggest considering making a music video and hiring a publicist for your next release. It's hard to push a release that's already been out for a bit so consider that for the next release. I dig the sound you're going for and am not sure if all of your songs are this long but definitely consider pitching shorter songs for a platform like this or at least something more immediate. Best of luck!

Jake Hackett submitted media.

You Know What You've Done by The Ripping Rivers

Lauren Gribble

Hi guys! I really enjoyed the song and I have nothing bad to say about it. I enjoyed the creativity behind it and that it was entirely your own work. I would love to hear more songs from you in the future. 

All the best, 

Lauren

Mee 丰

You know, I'm loving so much about this - the structure, energy, instrumentation - so much. Just something about the vocal that sounds unproduced / demo'ed. The vocal harmonies sound great, maybe it's just the vocal levels in the mix? Nah, it's something else - voice is great, it's not that. Dunno if it's the delivery, the conviction - or technical aspect - think it maybe be a mix of both. Get the vocal perfect, and you'll bowl me over. Hope this helps, really, this is excellent stuff, keep it coming!!

Alan Cross

Nice stuff. A couple of notes:

--The fade up at the beginning is a bit long for radio purposes. You might want to consider shortening it or dispensing with it altogether. That'll shorten up the running time, too.

--The full stops in the first half of the song seem awful long. Psychologically, I can tell you that will be a bit jarring to any radio people who might audition the song.

--Stylistically, I'm not sure where it fits in today's radio landscape, but in the era of streaming, that doesn't matter as much as it used to. More on that in a bit.

Now some questions.

1. What are your career goals? Radio play? Recording? Licensing and syncs? Income from a publishing deal? Soundtracks? All these paths need to be investigated.

2. Your social media strategy will be key. Make sure that you reply to every comment that may come in. Turn early fans into evangelists, especially the ones who contributed to this video. Get them to spread the word.  

3. If you don't already, get someone to handle getting your material on streaming music services, especially someone who knows how to get your songs on the best and music influential new music/new discovery playlists. They're becoming increasingly important. Ask Drake what it's like to benefit from clever playlist placement. 

4. If radio airplay is important to you, get a radio plugger. They know how to get to the right music directors. Work with both campus stations, public radio and commercial alternative/AAA radio. 

5. Make friends with as many bloggers as possible. Even the smallest want to think that they can discover The Next Big Thing. Every little bit of coverage helps.

6. How often do you play live? Nothing is better than having a group of strangers giving you real feedback in real time. But I have a feeling you knew that, right? 

7. And if budget allows it, try and get something up on YouTube. That's still the biggest source of music discovery in the known universe.

Glad to share this on my social networks. That should be good for about 100,000 people or so.