Mike Simmons

Mike Simmons

Mike Simmons


Title
The Doom Tomb
Bio
Songwriter Mike Simmons gathers a group of L.A. misfits for his newest project "The Doom Tomb". An audible exploration of Brett Easton Ellis' and Greg Araki's LA, The Doom Tomb's debut EP "Disturbia" takes the better elements of late 80's indie and college rock to create a jangly sun-kissed mirage of the discontented sub-culture of suburban California.

Recorded and produced by Mike Simmons, mixed and mastered by Keith Gretlein, this record is available across all streaming platforms and available commercially on Itunes and Amazon Music.

The songs "Un-Miserable" and "Dysmorphic" are available for free download at Thedoomtomb.bandcamp.com along with the rest of the record for purchase.

Future shows and releases will be announced later this summer.
 
https://twitter.com/The_Doom_Tomb

soundcloud.com/the-doom-tomb/

thedoomtomb.bandcamp.com/releases

Mixed And Mastered By Keith Gretlein
Location
Los Angeles, CA

Recent Submissions

Mike Simmons submitted media.

Dysmorphic by The Doom Tomb

D Grant Smith

Cool tune with a balanced recording. I enjoyed the whole thing, and now want to hear more of your music. Let's have a chat about that. Reach out to me dgrantsmith@gmail.com

Leks Maltby

On "Dysmorphic" by The Doom Tomb, the band lays down four minutes of melancholy mid-90s inspired alternative rock. Contemplative and deep, this song relies on high production values and well crafted melodies to keep the listener fixated on the heavier lyrical themes being discussed. An excellent song in the current climate of 90's nostalgia, if not slightly out of step with the prevailing indie rock idioms. This song would fit perfectly on a rock radio station between Soul Asylum and the Verve Pipe. Overall a great instrumental arrangement, if not slightly void of significant changes in dynamics within the song. A beautiful composition nonetheless, and definitely a thinking persons song with respect to the lyrical depth on display.

Jen Dan

Wow, "Dysmorphic" is beautiful song and harks back to the golden days/daze of early 90s indie pop.  It radiates a gentle longing through its crisp, but measured drum beat, occasional single cymbals crash, ticking stick percussion, hazily shining guitar strum, and soft, wistful vocals.
The song is subdued, but captivating, a slowly unfurling charmer with nice touches, like the sporadic vocal harmonizing.  
You spin a bittersweet story-teller, where a relationship seems to be in jeopardy, but it's all done very subtly - no overt drama; just inklings of a disturbance, at least from the vocal tone and sonics.
The lyrics tell another, more blunt, story, where the protagonist states, "No one was even right." and the other half, so to speak, declares, "Don't you know... / You're not happening."  Ouch.
But the tough lyrics are couched in such a languid, longing vibe that the words don't sting quite as much as they could.  
Although I'm having a bit of trouble discerning all of the lyrics, I'm really enjoying the overall reminiscing tone and the softer, airier vocal delivery that calms like a balm.  Lovely.

Mike Simmons submitted media.

Un-Miserable by The Doom Tomb

John Masters

Immediately I could head a strong Michael Stipe / REM vibe -- pretty good hooks and I like the shortness of it -- good tune!

Jen Dan

Heya guys!
You've got a sweet tune going for you here and I can understand The Smiths references for the guitar sonics and the lyrics and The Replacements for the casually delivered vocals.  I'm a sucker for a good jangle-pop tune and yours definitely caught my ear and swept me along for the length of the song.
"Un-Miserable" lightly carries a heavy malaise at its heart (from what I can make out, it's about miscommunication and failed relationships... ummm, maybe?) and it flows with a continually restless pace of briskly hit drums, shimmering cymbals scintillation, and the charming reverberations of guitar chime.  
While I do like the male vocals and the emotionally casual droop at the end of each phrase, I couldn't understand a lot of what was being sung.  I don't know if my ears aren't that sharp, or if you're intentionally muddling the lyrics.  
Interesting addition of the found sound spoken word where someone is talking about having been to a party and "it was crazy".  Sometimes audio clips like that distract or detract, but I think that fits well with the rest of the song.  
The song title, which becomes a mantra by its end, is great - where what is said is maybe not what is meant.  Nice tune!  Now I want to check out other songs you've done.

Craig Boliver

This was a really good track straight from the start and could really get people dancing and bopping around in bars. I don't know if the lower quality production was intentional, but it fit, really well for me. A few stray flaws, but I really think you could use a vintage / nostalgic recording process and to fuel the image of the band. It makes sense for the song structure and right now alternative radio stations would love to pick something up in this tone. 

Mike Simmons submitted media.

Youth Approximately by The Doom Tomb

Lauren Gribble

I loved the laid back feel of the song and the vocals added great texture! Thanks for sending!

John Masters

Nice vibes on this soft rock track -- vocals fit in well with the dreamy pop feel.  Sounds similar to The Shins and other indie rock stuff in that vein.  Fits in with a SoCal rock ideal.

Wiley Koepp

First impression is a mid-90s vibe a la a daytime set at Lollapalooza or the unreleased tracks from the 'Singles' soundtrack. Would fit really well on a radio playlist between The Cranberries and Blind Melon.  Interesting that the artist's take mentions "late 80s"--we're close, but I'd go with a 1/2-decade later.  That's minutia, though.

Really enjoy this song. Good summertime soundtrack, driving with that special someone music, or even that introspective headphones-on-at-home music when you just need some time for reflection. Pretty straightforward.  No otherworldly musicianship, but it's not going for that.  What I really connect with in this song are the Cure-like spacey guitars' soothing arpeggios and the 'singalongable' repetition of the chorus.

While I wouldn't classify this as a "holy shit, you've GOTTA here this song," it will easily go into the "I heard a song the other day that you might really like, by a new group in LA..."  

Nicely done.


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